Doors and Windows and Drywall, oh my!

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Having completed the installation of the exterior SIP panels, the laying of the brick façade is underway. The entire exterior of the building will be trimmed with a brick veneer that will stand a little more than waist high when completed. The remainder of the exterior of the building will be covered with fiber-cement siding.

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In addition to the brick work, the entire building will be wrapped with a synthetic plastic wrap that creates a moisture/weather resistant barrier (commonly referred to as Tyvek) between the siding and the SIPs panels.

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In addition to the Tyvek wrap and the brick veneer wall, the windows and doorways are being framed out.

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Here the masons are encasing the entire elevator shaft with bricks to give the appearance of a chimney when completed.

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In keeping with the “farmhouse” design, steel workers add the framed structure that will become the portico or “front porch” of the building. This portico, along with the chimney veneer will add to the “farmhouse” look and feel of the building, enhancing its overall appearance.

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The roofers continue to finish installing the roof panels and gutters to protect the building from the elements.

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Dominion Virginia Power is now installing the poles, lines, transformers, and other equipment necessary to connect electrical power to the building.

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Large conduit lines will be ran from the base of this pole--located on the Southwest corner of the property beside Fiddler Green Road--to accommodate the permanent power lines that will run underground into the building. This pole has transformers mounted at the top to control and regulate the amount of power sent to the facility.

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Taken from the second floor of the facility, this picture shows Dominion Virginia Power running the lines from the existing poles across Fiddler Green Road and onto the transit property.

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With the brick veneer completed, all of the exterior doors and windows are being installed. The two doors in the picture are the exterior exits from the driver training room. The smaller square windows across the top of each floor are “daylighting” windows that allow plenty of natural light to enter the building--minimizing the use of electrical lighting.

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This is the south side of the maintenance bay area with the new bay doors installed. These doors are made of specially manufactured glass that are actually opaque but still remain translucent to allow enough daylight into the maintenance area to reduce the use of electric artificial light. This is one of many “energy and cost saving” measures that have been incorporated into the design of the building.

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This is the north side of the maintenance bay area with the bay doors installed. Because this side of the building doesn’t receive as much direct sunlight as the south side, the daylighting windows are clear with a minimal tint for glare. Again, these windows are designed to allow a maximum amount of natural light to enter the building minimizing the use of electrical lighting and energy costs.

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Inside the shop area insulation is being installed on all of the walls and roof area prior to installing the drywall. This is the west wall of the shop with the insulation completed and ready for drywall.

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Here is the same wall with the drywall now partially installed. After the drywall is completed it will be finished with joint compound to create an even smooth surface for painting. Once the joint compound has dried and been sanded smooth, the walls will then be primed and painted.

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Inside the Equipment Room the Waste Oil Boiler is being installed. The boiler (red colored) will pump waste oil from the storage tanks (white colored to the right of the picture) to burn as fuel. The boiler will run off of “waste oil” created by recycling oil from our fleet through regular oil changes of the buses and support vehicles. The boiler will heat water while burning the recycled oil and pump the hot water through radiator-type pipes for radiant heat in the colder months throughout the maintenance area.

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Pictured here are two radiant panels for the waste oil boiler system. The copper colored pipes—shown coming out of the panel on the right--are mounted to the “radiant heat panels” in the ceiling of the maintenance bay area which will carry hot water for creating heat. By recycling and burning the “waste oil” from the oil changes, this has added another cost saving feature of the building and an environmentally responsible solution for heat in the shop area.

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This picture shows the radiant panels mounted in the ceiling area of the maintenance bays.

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In this picture you can see the radiant heat panels stretching across the maintenance bay above the doors. A contractor is installing insulation above the bay doors behind the radiant panels.

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With the brick veneer completed, the windows and doors being installed, and the “front porch” almost finished, the building stands ready to have its exterior finished off with fiber cement siding.

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